Author Topic: Moods of the sky behind our weather instruments 2019-20  (Read 2838 times)

bcurry

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Re: Moods of the sky behind our weather instruments 2019-20
« Reply #15 on: December 11, 2019, 10:37:47 pm »
3 inches (7.5 cm) of fluffy snow and a nice sunset behind my old weather station...


xairbusdriver

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Re: Moods of the sky behind our weather instruments 2019-20
« Reply #16 on: December 11, 2019, 11:15:26 pm »
I like the fluffy "stuff" above the horizon! [cheer] You can keep the "stuff" on the ground! [freeze]

Our area just hired a new weatherman who claims to have a powerful radar. He says it can actually melt snow while it is falling! After all radar is just a giant microwave, why not use its heating process for the 'greater good'?! ThU5:-)

Blicj11

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Re: Moods of the sky behind our weather instruments 2019-20
« Reply #17 on: December 12, 2019, 08:25:35 pm »
Beautiful capture, Bill. Thanks for sharing.
Blick


elagache

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Beautiful photo Bill! (Re: Moods of the sky . . . 2019-20)
« Reply #18 on: December 12, 2019, 11:55:31 pm »
Dear Bill, X-Air, Blick, and WeatherCat admirers of photographic art,

Thanks Bill for sharing that beautiful photo!  ThU32:-)

Our area just hired a new weatherman who claims to have a powerful radar. He says it can actually melt snow while it is falling! After all radar is just a giant microwave, why not use its heating process for the 'greater good'?! ThU5:-)

I dunno' . . . . .   In our parts of the country there are people terrorized by the radio frequency radiation coming off of the high voltage power lines and cell phone towers.  I suspect that trying to microwave the snow would run into some unexpected resistance.  Organized of course by those cell phone toting geniuses who are apparently not even remotely concerned about the radiation being generated by that very device next to their ear! . . .  [rolleyes2]

Cheers, Edouard  [cheers1]

elagache

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Melancholy solstice (Re: Moods of the sky . . . 2019-20)
« Reply #19 on: December 21, 2019, 12:12:59 am »
Dear WeatherCat observers of the seasons turning,

The 2019 Winter Solstice occurs on Sunday December 22nd at 4:19 am UTC.  Here is a listing of when it will be happening for towns nearby you:

https://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/fixedtime.html?iso=20191222T0419&msg=December%20Solstice%202019

This morning presented me with this ominous sky shortly before sunrise:



I find myself drawn to such scenes as they surely would have been experienced by ancient peoples performing their rituals at the start of winter.  In the cold of early morning, I feel a connection with those people, certainly cold, suffering from any number of ailments, and wondering if they would survive this coming winter.  They certainly had strong motivations to seek whatever spiritual intercession they were hoping for.

We live in times where spirituality and religion are derided and devalued.  Under such conditions it is easy to dismiss ancient religions as silly superstitions and myths.  Yet are we demonstrating our own wisdom in doing so?  After all, undeniably those ancients are our ancestors.  If their religious practice was a vain folly - how did humankind survive to bring about our modern world?

I therefore am forced to a somewhat radical position.  If human spirituality has ever been of value, it must have somehow always been of value.  In so far as it was sincere, a human attempt to connect with forces beyond our control to influence our future must somehow not be in vain.  Moreover, the religious traditions of today cannot be seen making ancient faith as vain and empty.  Instead somehow the spirituality of today represents the answer to the spiritual longings of ancient times.

In our modern world, there is a curious confidence that reason alone is sufficient to not only assure survival but steer us to happiness.  It on that confidence that many dismiss religion has irrational and ultimately more destructive than constructive.  Yet, upon what is that confidence founded?  Modern science is at best only about 500 years old.  The secularization of society is really no more than about a century old.  The oldest religious site thus far discovered is G?bekli Tepe and is at least 12,000 years old.  For all of its detractors, religious practice has guided human activities and aspirations for a period at least 100 times longer than our supposedly rational secularized world.  It doesn't take much time glancing over the news headlines before doubts set in about exactly how rationally our modern world is managed.

It is said: "there are not atheists in the foxhole."  We are facing extremely difficult circumstances: locally, nationally, and globally.  Yet, the folly of the secularization of Christmas continues unabated no matter what the somber realities we face.  The question should be asked: who's practices are ultimately more in vain: the struggling practitioner of faith?, or the "painted clown" spreading a vacuous insistence of merriment whatever the circumstances?  Perhaps we all need to spend a little time in the cold before dawn during this season of great change.

Edouard     

xairbusdriver

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Re: Moods of the sky behind our weather instruments 2019-20
« Reply #20 on: December 21, 2019, 03:09:16 am »
Our modern "wisdom"? Where was that in the launch just a day ago by Boeing that failed to reach the correct orbit because it had an inaccurate clock? It wasn't even a "new" rocket! It was an "old" Atlas 5, been around for over a decade, I think. Of course, "clocks" have been around even before the "space age". But for all the checks, tests and human "wisdom" somehow the clock was incorrectly set!

What are you thankful for this Season? Who do you have faith in?

Don't try to rationalize with
an irrational person...

elagache

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Soulful existentialism . . . . (Re: Moods of the sky . . . 2019-20)
« Reply #21 on: December 21, 2019, 10:52:00 pm »
Dear X-Air and WeatherCat soul searchers, . . . . .

Our modern "wisdom"? . . . . . .

Before you grumble about bad engineering, consider quandary we find in the foundations of logic.  All of human reasoning is formulated on what can be formalized as classical logic.  It is the basis of all mathematics and therefore the symbolic language of disciplines like Physics.  But wait, classical logic is wrong.

From the uncertainty principle, it can be shown that classical logic makes an assumption not supported by quantum mechanics.  As a result there has arisen an alternative logic: Quantum Logic.  Unfortunately, you cannot underpin our modern mathematical machinery on this weaker set of logical postulates.  It was true when I was an undergraduate at U.C. Berkeley and I just checked, the inconsistency remains.  Point blank, what we propose to understand through logical and mathematics is founded on an internal inconsistency.  From a logical point of view, we really cannot validate anything we believe through the machinery of mathematics.

What are you thankful for this Season? Who do you have faith in?

I would hope that any honest person, no matter how devote in their faith, must accept that human spirituality is also internally inconsistent - and that's absolutely a bad thing.  Much suffering has been caused by these conflicts and sadly, more often than not, wisdom does not prevail when it comes to coping with these conflicts.

I have my reasons for believing what I do, but in order to bring coherence to my thinking, I have been forced to basically pull away the threads that band together various belief systems and then attempted to reassemble human spirituality as a sort of continuous narrative going from very ancient belief systems to our present day.

I think we all need to be thoughtful about what we believe in and accept, not only that others think differently from us, but that Descartes' deceiving demon is present everywhere warping our beliefs.  The task before us must be undertaken first and foremost with much humility.  Sadly, humility, like true faith, is in desperately short supply these days.

Edouard

elagache

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Last of the old, first of the new! (Re: Moods of the sky . . . 2019-20)
« Reply #22 on: January 03, 2020, 12:04:20 am »
Dear WeatherCat observers of the seasons turning,

I'll never know what will greet my eye each morning.  On the 31st of December, this predawn sky was behind my anemometer:



While not too threatening, it did have a bit of an ominous feel to it.  Perhaps an appropriate end to what was a particularly rough year here in Northern California.

24 hours later this is what greeted me:



Hopeful or not?  Unless there is an astrologer in the audience who specializes in foretelling the future from the sunrise, I suspect we all will have to find out what is in store for 2020 "da' ol' fashioned way" . . . by actually living it out!   [biggrin]

Cheers, Edouard  [cheers1]

elagache

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Sunrise for unsettled weather. (Re: Moods of the sky . . . 2019-20)
« Reply #23 on: January 12, 2020, 11:25:44 pm »
Dear WeatherCat observers of the seasons turning,

We are headed for a more "unsettled" weather pattern this week.  This morning I was greeted by this scene of illuminated clouds:



I thought it was a particularly pretty collection of colors that was worth sharing.

Enjoy!

Cheers, Edouard  [cheers1]

elagache

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Clouds before a placid week. (Re: Moods of the sky . . . 2019-20)
« Reply #24 on: January 27, 2020, 10:38:15 pm »
Dear WeatherCat observers of the seasons turning,

This morning I was greeted by a placid scene before sunrise:



It is expected to be a quiet and surprisingly springlike this week, so I suppose it is an appropriate sunrise "forecast."

Enjoy!

Cheers, Edouard  [cheers1]

elagache

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Snow Moon 2020 (Re: Moods of the sky . . . 2019-20)
« Reply #25 on: February 08, 2020, 09:31:10 pm »
Dear WeatherCat observers of the season's turning,

Tonight is the so called "Snow" full Moon - the first of the new decade.  Yesterday I captured the Moon next to my anemometer: 



Definitely no risk of snow around here, but alas, things remain distressingly dry.

Oh well, . . . . . Edouard