Author Topic: Welcome to summer 2019!  (Read 687 times)

elagache

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Welcome to summer 2019!
« on: June 20, 2019, 10:17:15 PM »
Dear WeatherCat observers of the seasons turning,

For the Northern Hemisphere, the Summer Solstice is the longest day of the year.  This year it occurs around the 21th of June.  Here is a website with the exact time of the Solstice for various locations around the world.

https://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/fixedtime.html?iso=20190621T1554&msg=June%20Solstice%202019

In California, the time of hot dry weather has arrived.  Here is the same hillside I photographed earlier this spring:

http://athena.trixology.com/index.php?topic=2947.msg28932#msg28932



Alas, the late rains have had little effect on the dried out grasses.  Still, there is some more pleasant aspects of Summer in Northern California.  There is the rolling of the fog in and out.  Here are some palm trees in front of the marine layer:



Unfortunately, we are seeing considerably less fog in recent years and that is causing a serious uptick in temperatures.

There are still some late blooming shrubs like these oleander:



There is also some of the first fruits of the season.  Here is another yellow plum tree with the fading blossoms of buckeye trees behind:



Still the creeks are starting to run dry:



This year there is something new upon the land:



In the wake of the destruction of Paradise and other regions by wildfire, there is a feverish attempt to reduce the risk of fires spreading - especially around power lines.  While the goal is laudable, the rote removal of growth really doesn't guarantee anything.  Attempting to prevent a repeat of one wildfire scenario hardly precludes others.  At the same time living plants remove greenhouse gases from atmosphere.  No matter what you do with dead vegetation, it releases CO2 as it decomposes.  In addition trees provide shade that reduces overall temperatures.  While not definitive, there is some evidence that Urban Heat Islands are contributing to climate change.  So the haste to reduce one sort of wildfire risk could be ultimately increasing the risk in other ways.  It is always sad to see a tree die, sadder still when a tree is removed more out of fear than reason.

Such are the conditions that prevail in California at the start of Summer 2019. . . . . . .

Edouard

xairbusdriver

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Re: Welcome to summer 2019!
« Reply #1 on: June 21, 2019, 12:44:21 AM »
You can't argue with the idea that if you cut down a tree, it can't burn down... :o [goofy] [rolleyes2] [banghead]

JosBaz

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Re: Welcome to summer 2019!
« Reply #2 on: June 22, 2019, 10:36:08 AM »
This time of year is also the best for spotting Noctilucent clouds (NLC). Last night they were exceptionally bright, and visible in large parts of Europe. Some photo's I took close to where I live.

Jos


elagache

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Pretty! Thanks for sharing! (Re: Welcome to summer 2019!)
« Reply #3 on: June 22, 2019, 10:02:19 PM »
Dear X-Air, Jos, and WeatherCat observers of the seasons turning,

This time of year is also the best for spotting Noctilucent clouds (NLC). Last night they were exceptionally bright, and visible in large parts of Europe. Some photo's I took close to where I live.

Thank you very much for sharing!  Indeed these are very pretty cloud formations!  Honestly, I had never heard of Noctilucent clouds before your post.  Here is some more information about it on Wikipedia:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noctilucent_cloud

I don't know how many WeatherCatters live at latitudes of 50° to 65˚, so you most likely one of the very few who can see these first-hand.  Thanks for sharing a phenomena most of us will never see.

Cheers, Edouard  [cheers1]

xairbusdriver

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Re: Welcome to summer 2019!
« Reply #4 on: June 23, 2019, 04:00:35 AM »
Thanks Josbaz! A totally new cloud type to me, also! While I live much too far south to see them, I spent a lot time flying around sunrise, sometimes at quite high altitudes. Those circumstances should have enabled me to see these formations. But the conditions must be fairly rare as well as cold!!! [freeze]

Blicj11

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Re: Welcome to summer 2019!
« Reply #5 on: June 27, 2019, 04:50:50 PM »
Really nice photos JosBaz and a cloud type I have not heard of previously. Thanks for the education.
Blick


elagache

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Naked Lady flowers in bloom. (Re: Summer 2019!)
« Reply #6 on: August 05, 2019, 11:46:41 PM »
Dear WeatherCat observers of the seasons turning,

We are suffering from hot and humid weather produced by the remnants of tropical storm Gil.  It it very much this time of year when the Naked Lady flowers start to bring up their naked stalks and then bloom.  Here is a group of these flowers among the weeds:



While they are not native to California, they do seem to thrive here and easily make the transition from people's yards into wild spaces.

Cheers, Edouard  [cheers1]

elagache

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Scar from a controlled burn. (Re: Welcome to summer 2019!)
« Reply #7 on: August 09, 2019, 11:27:52 PM »
Dear WeatherCat observers of the seasons turning,

Thus far, it has been one of the most calm wild-fire seasons of recent memory.  That doesn't keep the fire fighters from preparing for the worst.  Oddly, our local fire department had a controlled burn yesterday.  This morning I was able to capture the burn scar:



August seems extremely late for this sort of thing, but the weather was unusually favorable.  Certainly it was an excellent opportunity to train with the extremely dry fuels that can be expected from now until the rains return.

Cheers, Edouard

Blicj11

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Re: Welcome to summer 2019!
« Reply #8 on: August 21, 2019, 03:28:12 PM »
I serve on the board of our local water utility and participated in a discussion of a controlled burn by the county. Here, such burns occurs during the dead of winter, when there is snow on the ground. I like that type of cautious planning regarding purposely starting a fire.
Blick


elagache

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Yes, we were nervous . . . (Re: Welcome to summer 2019!)
« Reply #9 on: August 21, 2019, 10:54:39 PM »
Welcome back Blick!  :)

I serve on the board of our local water utility and participated in a discussion of a controlled burn by the county. Here, such burns occurs during the dead of winter, when there is snow on the ground. I like that type of cautious planning regarding purposely starting a fire.

Yes, the locals around here were just as surprised as you are at a controlled burn in the middle of the wildfire season.  I think the explanation is one of those "only in California" scenarios.  It was a very small region that was burned, but it was  near the top of a ridge were some very expensive homes are located.  Whatever the excuse, I think our local fire district decided to create a buffer between anything flammable and those expensive homes.  Should a grass fire start on that hill, the houses should be protected by the region now burnt.

Like so many things in California, behavior is frequently driven by the desire not to be the victim of litigation!

Oh well, . . . . . Edouard   

elagache

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Removing CO2 da' ol' fashioned way! (Re: Summer 2019!)
« Reply #10 on: August 27, 2019, 11:21:53 PM »
Dear WeatherCat observers of the seasons turning,

The days are getting shorter, but it is still very hot and dry here in California.  As a result, you can see some unusual things.  Recently I spotted something new in one of our birdbaths:



Yes indeed those are bubbles of gas, and not any arbitrary gas, that's Oxygen being produced as a result of photosynthesis.  That bird bath gets only about 2 hours of direct sunshine in the late afternoon.  Before that there are no bubbles.  This photo was taken at close to "full production."  This is of course the process that ultimately filled our atmosphere with the Oxygen we all depend on.

Just before I was about to leave I was able to capture one more unusual picture:



Yes, that is a fly taking a drink in our bird bath.  The conditions are so dry that even insects are attracted to the bird baths for water.

Such are the conditions in California these days.

Cheers, Edouard  [cheers1]

elagache

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A deer eating . . . . . bird seed!?!?! (Re: Summer 2019!)
« Reply #11 on: Yesterday at 11:37:15 PM »
Dear WeatherCat observers of the seasons turning,

Yes the equinox is just a few days away, but in California the conditions remain hot, dry, and hostile to life.  Just how hostile?



This is no Photoshop fake, yes that is a deer literally licking up bird seed from off of our driveway.  There are plenty of reasons for this situation, but it still staggers the imagination that creatures could be forced to these extremes.

Such are da' conditions that prevail in California these days, . . . . . .

Oh well, . . . . . Edouard