Author Topic: Monthly reports for the Northern California 2018-19 rainy season.  (Read 95 times)

elagache

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Dear WeatherCat drought watchers,

Continuing the annual tradition, here is the first report from Canebas Weather Station regarding the Northern California rainy season.  October only brought 0.02" of rain, so it wasn't worth reporting.  However, November was a different story.  We received 5.41" of rain (137mm).  That was basically sufficient to catch us up for the entire rain season thus far.  This can be easily seen on the graph:



Of course lots of a rain in a very short period of time doesn't have the same effect as gentle rains over a longer period of time.  However, in the drought-parched West, we'll take any rain we can get!

Cheers, Edouard  [cheers1]

elagache

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December (Re: Reports for the North CA 2018-19 rainy season.)
« Reply #1 on: December 31, 2018, 10:55:15 PM »
Dear WeatherCat Drought watchers,

Another month is at a close so it is time to tally up the precipitation and see were Canebas Weather Station is at with respect to normal.  Alas the news isn't so good.  December has been unusually cool and dry.  Storms have been few and not as "juicy" with the exception of one atmospheric river event.  As a result we only received 2.66" of rain (67.6 mm.)  That is only 75% of the normal rainfall for December.



Because December is an important rainfall month in Northern California, the cumulative numbers are also hurting.  We are down to only 79% of what would be to date a normal season.  The shortfall isn't to extreme yet, but the overall trend is disturbingly similar to recent years.  Instead of rain falling steadily throughout the wet season, we are increasingly reliant on atmospheric river events to bring extreme rains in short periods of time.  This trend has resulted in more rain during the mid-seasons and less during the middle of winter when California normally receives the bulk of its rains.  January is a new month of a new year.  The Climate Prediction Center medium range forecasts are the moment encouraging.  Alas, the drought worries are definitely back.

Oh well, . . . . . Edouard